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Village Square 

COMMUNITY NEWSLETTER

SEPTEMBER 2019

News

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Hello, Neighbor!

Autumn 2019 will begin on Monday, September 23 and ends on Saturday, December 21. Pretty soon leaves will crunch beneath our feet. With the change of season comes another edition of your community newsletter. In this issue, you’ll find the inside scoop on happenings in the area, contests, tips for being a good neighbor, a Chocolate Chess Pie recipe, how you can try to avoid the flu and more. Is there something specific you would like to see in the newsletter? Interested in starting a club? We want to hear from you! Send us your feedback. We are interested in your ideas and so is YOUR community!

Very Grateful, 

Kristy Payne, HOA President

Volunteers Needed for Community Committees:

1

 

 

LANDSCAPE &
MAINTENANCE

Keeping Property
Values High.

2

 

 

SOCIAL

EVENTS

Connecting our
community.

3

 

 

COMMUNITY

WATCH

Keeping our families
and property safe.

 

 

NEWSLETTER

 

Keeping homeowners informed.

4

What's Inside

The Hunt is On!

Kristy, your HOA President has hidden 3 eggs somewhere on the website. Can you find them? 

Kristy will give you a delicious treat if you can.

 

Find all 3 hidden eggs on the website and be entered for a chance to win and if your name is chosen, Kristy will give you the choice of your favorite candybar.*

Happy Hunting!

How to Play?

Look for eggs on this website.

Note: You must find all 3.

When you find an egg:

  • Click on the egg – it will bring up a pop up with a form on it. Fill out the form. 

 

All entries must be received by

5:00 PM on Monday, September 23.

The drawing will be held on Tuesday, September 24th and the winner will be notified on the same day.

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*Must live in The Camelot Village and Malory Square Community to participate and be over the age of 18.  Homeowners that owe HOA dues or fines, are disqualified.

Community Events

Rock The Block

Saturday, September 14th, 2019 from 3:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Camelot Village Avenue 

(Between Pearl Road and Sir Michel Drive)

 

Your Social Events Committee has been hard at work planning this fun Free Event for all of the Community to enjoy.

What is Rock The Block?

It is a Neighborhood party. All residents are welcome. It's a fun way to meet neighbors, build friendships and develop a sense of belonging and security among residents.

You must REGISTER to receive a FREE hotdog, bag of chips and a drink at the event. To register, please visit: https://www.hoa.tcvmsc.com/signup

Choose how many tickets you will need, one per person please.

When you register, you will also have the option to sign up and volunteer at the event. Be sure to pick up your tickets at the sign in table when you arrive.

There will be Music, Games, crafts and more!

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Did you Know?

Use smart light bulbs like the one above on the outside of your home & on your porch. This way you can turn on the light from anywhere.  You can also program your smart light bulb to come on at dusk and go off at dawn everyday.

Just set it and forget it.

In our Architectural Guidelines and Property Standards it states:

"The Association requests that all exterior lamps be on from dusk to dawn. It is the homeowner’s responsibility to changes out bulbs, etc."

Why you ask?

 

Porch lights help keep you and your loved ones safe. You don’t fumble for your keys when the light is on. Instead, you’re inside the door within moments. The light also deters burglars who tend to avoid a home that looks occupied. But leaving the light on isn’t an automatic guarantee of safety. Burglars pay attention to how and when you turn on outside lighting. To prevent your house from being robbed, think about when it’s best to keep the porch light on or off.

When you’re home at night, you should leave a light on. It alerts burglars to your presence, particularly if indoor lights are on too. The porch light also acts as a spotlight on the front door. You can easily see who’s approaching through either a window or peephole.

When you or a family member plans to come home late at night, you should turn on the porch light. It helps people get to the door and unlock it safely.

Kristy Payne

President's Corner

Residents that live in Camelot Village, Thank you to all who answered their doors and volunteered to sign the 25 mph speed limit sign petition. Your HOA Board of Directors thank you. Here is an email update I received regarding the speed limit signs.

 

August 29th, 2019

Ms. Payne,

 

I received your communities petitions yesterday. I’m planning on taking a closer look at them either today or tomorrow and will reach out to you if I need any additional information.

 

These will likely be placed on the first October City Council agenda for City Council’s review.  If anything changes regarding that date I will reach out and let you know.

 

Thank you so much for your hard work and completing the petition forms.

 

Will R Shumaker

Traffic Calming Administrator

City of Raleigh

Department of Transportation

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Meet Your Neighbors

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Article Submitted by: Cheryl McCall

Hello everyone! My name is Cheryl McCall. My daughter Kendra and I moved into our home in Malory Square February 2019. I have been in NC for 3 years. I relocated from Dayton, Ohio for work. I work in the healthcare insurance industry. Kendra is a 2017 graduate of Bowling Greene State University in Ohio with a degree in Nutrition. We of course are Ohio State Football fans! We are still getting to know the great state of NC right now. We really love going to outdoor music festivals and Food truck events. Our Saturday routine is going to the Farmers market for fresh produce. We love to travel and just returned from a 7 night Caribbean cruise. We look forward to seeing our community grow as well as meeting our neighbors.

Yard of theMonth

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September's

winner is

Danielle Kenan!

What is it?

We recognize neighbors who demonstrate above average efforts in maintaining their yards that best exemplifies uniqueness, beauty, appeal, and consistency with the guidelines. Winners will be notified, a decorative yard sign & a $25 Visa Gift Card will be delivered at the beginning of each month and photos of the yard will be posted on the HOA website and featured in the monthly newsletter. 

How do I win?

It's easy! Take great care of your lawn and follow the criteria.*

Criteria:

Yard of the Month candidates are judged solely on the total exterior appearance of their property and front yard as seen from the street. 

Factors include but are not limited to; overall appearance, tidiness, neatness of the front of the property as evidenced by pruned, trimmed and shaped foliage, edged and defined lawns, borders and flower beds and visually appealing.

Lawn: Grass should be healthy with no bare spots or excessive weeds. Grass should be mowed and edged/trimmed around flower beds, driveways, curbs, walkways and fences.

Landscaping and Flower Beds: Flower beds should be weeded and edged, flowers must be well maintained and dead plants removed, trees and shrubs pruned, natural areas cleaned. 

Walkways and Driveways:  Walkways and driveways shall be clean (including trash containers or yard products be removed from view). The area in front of the curb must be free from debris and dirt.

Guidelines:

All properties within the neighborhood are automatically eligible.

Key criteria include manicured yard, overall appearance, originality and creativity.

The upkeep of the property can be maintained by residents themselves or a professional.

An award duration term lasts a single calendar month and runs from the first day to the last day of the calendar month.

The same property cannot receive more than one award in a 12-month calendar period.

While an individual’s home is being recognized as a “Yard of the Month,” they are expected to maintain their yard in the same manner that allowed them to win the title.

*Homeowners that owe HOA dues or fines, are disqualified.

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Need a babysitter? Call or text Kailey (age 17)
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Funnies

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Recipes

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Chocolate Chess Pie

Submitted by: Courtney Chance

INGREDIENTS

1 unbaked frozen pie shell

1/2 cup butter

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

2 ounces Baker's semi-sweet chocolate

2 eggs

1 cup sugar

dash of salt

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

2. Melt the butter and chocolate in a saucepan on medium heat, stirring until smooth. Stir in the vanilla extract.

3. Using an electric mixing bowl, beat eggs while gradually adding in the sugar. Add in salt and beat.

4. Then add the warm chocolate and butter mixture and beat well (until light and airy).

5. Pour your batter into the pie crust and bake for 30-35 minutes or until slightly puffed.

 

Be sure to allow the pie to cool before cutting.

I often refrigerate mine until ready to serve.

Out  & About

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Raleigh Greek Festival

Friday, September 6, 2019

5:00 PM to 10:00 PM
Saturday, September 7, 2019

11:00 AM to 10:00 PM
Sunday, September 8, 2019

11:00 AM to 6:00 PM

1025 Blue Ridge Road

Raleigh

¡La Fiesta del Pueblo 2019!

Sunday, September 22, 2019

12 PM – 6 PM

Raleigh City Plaza

400 block Fayetteville St

Raleigh

Storytelling Festival

September 28, 2019

11 AM – 4 PM

Historic Oak View County Park

4028 Carya Drive

Raleigh

Garner Pop Up Market

Sunday, September 29, 2019

12 PM – 4:15 PM

Downtown Garner

120 E. Main St.

Garner

Neighbor Neighbor

2

21 Simple Ways You Can Be a Better Neighbor

Common Courtesies

  • Actually introduce yourself, especially if you’re new to the neighborhood or building.

  • Go one step beyond an introduction – give your neighbor your phone number. And, because we’re not all geniuses at remembering names, write your name down alongside it.

  • Make an effort to remember names yourself. Add them to your contacts list, write them down and stick them on your refrigerator, whatever it takes.

  • Get to know the neighborhood (or at least your street) by actively engaging with people as you see them out and about.

  • Go out of your way to be friendly, even if you aren’t really friends. And remember you don’t have to be close to your neighbors to be warm or sociable.

  • Stop to say “hello” when you cross paths.

  • Keep tabs on your house sounds, like loud music or impromptu dance parties.

  • Give your neighbors a heads up about special events, like potentially loud parties.

Check Yourself

  • Be proactive about your pets – including their late-night barking tendencies, or their preference for marking the neighbor’s rose bushes.

  • Don’t hide out. It’s tempting, especially with a fence or door to protect you, but time spent in a slightly more common (or at least visible) area will help you break down those boundaries.

  • Set your expectations appropriately. Your neighbors may not be as neighborly as you are and that’s okay!

  • Have realistic expectations for the noise levels of those living immediately around you. And take note of your frustrations – so you can make sure you aren’t unintentionally creating the same frustrations in anyone who may live beside you.

  • Step outside your comfort zone. Put neighborhood-wide events on your calendar and then participate! Whether it’s a block party or HOA event, make an effort to make an appearance.

  • Practice common-sense sound control when it comes to music and instruments.

Do Unto Others

  • Have empathy for their stage of life and the schedule that goes with it! Think things like newborn naps and night shift work hours.

  • Offer to babysit, pet-sit, or even just keep an eye on their home if they’re headed out for a date night or have clued you into their vacation plans.

  • Share your handyman skills, if you have them!

  • Be direct about questions, concerns, or any neighborly problems that pop up. Passive aggressive neighbors do no one any good.

  • To take conflict resolution one step further, address any disputes in person – and never on social networking sites like Nextdoor or Facebook.

  • Looking for an ice-breaker? Make your front yard or entryway as inviting as possible. Maybe turn on the lights at night or even go so far as setting up a neighborhood lending library.

  • Aim for small offerings: Hauling a neighbor’s trash can to the curb or dropping their newspaper on the front step.

Safety Tips

What You Can Do to Avoid the Flu

Fever, headache, fatigue, dry cough, sore throat, stuffy nose, nausea: If these symptoms hit, you may have been bitten by the flu bug.

Who is Most Vulnerable?

People over age 65 comprised about 70% to 90% of all cases of flu in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Children younger than 5 also are at high risk.

Flu Shot

An Epidemic Every Year

Flu season occurs in the fall and winter, peaking between late November and early March, and it's an epidemic every year. The makeup of flu viruses can change from year to year, making it difficult to predict. Flu spreads through droplets when people sneeze or cough, and on surfaces. People are contagious one day before symptoms appear and up to a week after. When you don't feel well, it's best to take care of yourself and co-workers by staying home. And don't go back to work (or school) for at least 24 hours after a fever is gone.

You Can Stay Healthy

  • CDC recommends everyone older than 6 months get an annual flu vaccine as soon as the vaccine becomes available; October is the ideal time to get vaccinated, but it's never too late

  • If you don't like needles, ask your doctor if a nasal flu spray is available

  • Avoid being around sick people if possible

  • Wash your hands frequently with soap and water, or use hand sanitizer

  • Cover your mouth when coughing or sneezing, preferably with the inside of your arm rather than your hand

  • Avoid touching your face

  • Disinfect surfaces that may be contaminated

Handy HomeTips

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"Your home is replaceable...

your family isn't."

Fall Maintenance Inside Your Home

Submitted by: Michele Hurst

  • Keep things dry in the crawlspace, basement and attic: If you have a sump pump, make sure it is in good working condition and check for wet spots or puddles in the crawlspace.

  • Look for leaks: Give your water heater (have you drained it lately?) a quick exam.

  • Do some fall cleaning: Clean and tune your furnace, water heater, along with your oven and range.

  • Seal things up: If you feel any drafts around windows or doors, now is the time to address them and check your attic insulation, too.

  • Check your smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors: Even ones that are powered through your home’s electrical system, they typically have a backup battery that might need replacing.

  • Get ready for fireplace season: Make sure there’s no soot or creosote accumulation and consider having a chimney sweep do an inspection.

  • Speaking of fires... do you have fire extinguishers in your home? You should (one per floor, at least). The pressure indicator should show a charge, and the lock pin should be intact.

  • Revisit (or create) your family emergency escape plan and emergency kit. Make sure everyone knows how to get out of their room and where to meet once they’re out of the house. Your home is replaceable — your family isn’t.

Join Girl Scouts

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Kick off - September 14th

Accepting all levels

 

Daisy  (K-1):

Troop #97

Brownie (Grades 2-3):

Troop #114

Juniors (Grades 4-5):

Troop #1041

Teens (Grades 6 +up):

Troop #359

The troop meets at:

Compassionate Baptist Church

2310 Rock Quarry Road (Across from SE Raleigh HS)

 

They meet every 2nd & 4th Saturday of the month.

From 10:30am - 12:30pm

 

Contact Information: 

Carolyn Dove - (919) 630 - 3744

Information Submitted by:

Tisha Johnson

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Submit anArticle

The purpose of “Village Square News” is to inform residents of business affairs of the community, issues affecting residential and community property, useful information of general interest and reference information for community resources. No political advertising or church news will be accepted. All information, articles and small business ads, recipes submitted to the Committee become the property of the Community Association, which publishes articles at its’ sole discretion.

 

Article submissions, suggestions and more:

Deadlines for newsletter submissions:

• January – December 20

• February – January 20

• March – February 20

• April – March 20

• May – April 20

• June – May 20

• July – June 20

• August – July 20

• September – August 20

• October – September 20

• November – October 20

• December – November 20

 

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Produced under the authority of The Camelot Village and Malory Square Community Association by the Newsletter Committee.

 

Committee Members:

Kristy Payne

Courtney Chance

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